#AtoZChallenge2015: Orthogonal

The word orthogonal conjures up memories of wonderful maths classes, many years ago, as well as more obscure readings, much later, of absconse topological subjects. Geometry was one of the great pleasures of my youth: yes, we are all different! I quote from: Barile, Margherita. "Orthogonal." From MathWorld--A Wolfram Web Resource, created by Eric W. Weisstein. http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Orthogonal.html "In elementary … Continue reading #AtoZChallenge2015: Orthogonal

#AtoZAprilChallenge: Fiction

 “Fiction has the interesting double sense of a kind of Imaginative Literature and of pure (sometimes deliberately deceptive) invention… A general use, ranging between a consciously formed hypothesis (‘mathematical fictions’ 1579) and an artificial  and questionable assumption (‘of his own fiction’), was equally common. Fictitious, from C17, ranged from this to the sense of deceptive … Continue reading #AtoZAprilChallenge: Fiction

#WritersWednesday: His Hero is Marcel

It goes for colours, type-faces, places, objects, smiles, books… The human spirit is attracted, inspired, by “things”, in a fashion that appears random to the observer (“tastes and colours…” goes the French saying). But it isn’t. There are reasons for everything, and randomness is often a metaphor for “we can’t explain this”. Julian is attracted … Continue reading #WritersWednesday: His Hero is Marcel

#AtoZChallenge: April 5, 2013 ~ Euler and “e”

Euler and e  Leonhard Euler is a towering  figure of Mathematics and Physics in the 18th century, and one of the greatest mathematicians of all times.  Born in 15 April 1707 in Basel (Schweiz, Switzerland) Euler’s legacy includes “e” the Euler number, with pi one of the fundamental constants of mathematics, and volumes on infinitesimal … Continue reading #AtoZChallenge: April 5, 2013 ~ Euler and “e”