Bells #writephoto

Thursday photo prompt

blue

 

“This brings back memories…”

“Do you mean when we were young?”

“O yes, younger in any case, and then so was the world…”

“If I were bue…”

“like Edward Hopper’s afternoon

lift the sash to air the breeze

let my summer flush your cheek

lie supine beneath the soft and gentle season…”

 

Between absence and presence

A reading of Killing Commendatore by Haruki Murakami

Jean_Siméon_Chardin_-_Draughtsman_-_WGA04754

 

This is Mr Murakami’s latest work, published in Japan in 2017, and translated by Philip Gabriel and Ted Goossen (I guess: a tour de force). First of all, I must say that, in my view, this is Mr Murakami’s most accomplished work thus far, a fascinating, troubling and at time challenging novel. To be sure, long haul readers will find there a familiar atmosphere, but also the unknown. I will not spoil anything, but mention some ideas and metaphors.

There is a young artist, a portrait painter, and his beautiful, estranged wife. There is a, now dead, beloved little sister. There is  a lone timber house, high up in the mountains, which belongs to a famous old painter. There is an owl in the attic. Across the valley, there is a big, strange house, with a stranger owner.

The young artist teaches drawing at a local school. He lives on his own, in the timber house, with the owl in the attic, visits the attic, walks in the woods. Behind a little shrine he discovers a pit, the pit in the woods. There is the start of the quest, with a surprising painting, and a bell.

There is Vienna, at the time of the Anschluss, there is the war in China, but this is the past, with deep consequences for the present. The old painter is famous for his classical formal Japanese paintings, but this one painting…

The novel oscillates between dream and an even more unfathomable reality. There is a lovely, pubescent young girl, her beautiful aunt, and two portraits, or is it three?

Once started this, as with all of Mr Murakami’s work, the book becomes desperately addictive: one dreads the prospect of finishing the book.

Yet the quest has to be completed, through sacrifice and ordeal.

I must add a warning: if readers wish to cross the river, between absence and presence, they must pay the ferryman. So, have your penguin ready!

That’s about the size of it.

Image: der Zeichner (the young draughtsman) by Jean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin (Gemäldegalerie, Berlin)

Waiting #DailyPost #Autumn

From the exquisite crew

Processed with VSCO with se3 preset

 

We look out on the street, the scenery of everyday, ever changing, never fading. Autumn is there, palpable, in the leaves blown across the sidewalks, in the colours of the trees, in the chill in the air. Slowly, implacably, the city changes to its winter clothes.

You and I are waiting, loving, reading, light jazz floating through the rooms. Soon the chill will turn to ice, us too will wear our winter coats.

We love the city, we will never stop waiting.

Image: Glas und Metal, Berlin , September 2016 – via jasminmeyer

#AtoZAprilChallenge: Vinyl

VinylWith the wonders of  “digital remastering” ancient rockers of my generation can enjoy again the pleasures of old  7-inch records, discovering or rediscovering long forgotten musical treasures . Ah! The good old “45 tours” (45 RPM) vinyl marvels, with their fragile paper covers, the beautiful or garish pictures of young stars in action… Ah Gene Vincent, Billy Holly, the young King… rock n’ roll, jazz, be-bop, blues… The little objects scattered on the floor of our rooms, sometimes mixed with the peeled off garments and undergarments of boyfriends and/or girlfriends, sometimes broken… Vinyl and Coca-Cola…

Vinyl, they say, enjoys a revival. A good thing for sure, for those of us lucky enough to still own a working turntable… And the sound of the needle scratching the surface! No serious mixing without needles and vinyl! Oh glory of vinyl!

Image: vinyl records shops in a small area (Reuterkiez) of Berlin-Kreuzberg, courtesy of Taz Berlin (issue of 17/18 April 2014)

Vinyl Records Store

The eight tribes of vinyl collector

#AtoZChallenge: April 19, 2013: Q = 九

1Q84 In the Japanese numerals system the number “9” is 九, and its name is kyū, or ku, or kokonotsu, identical to the letter “Q”, so that ichi-ku-hachi-yon, 1Q84, Haruki Murakami’s masterpiece, is also “1984”, a reference to George Orwell’s masterpiece.

There are three main alphabets in Japanese: Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji, plus the phonetic version of the western alphabet: “romaji”.  Hiragana consists mainly of Chinese syllables, and until the 10th century AD was used solely by women.  Katakana is a subset of Kanji, originally developed by monks from the Chinese syllabic alphabet.  Kanji is the written alphabet of 5,000 to 10,000 symbols.

1984

Images: 1Q84 ~ © Julien Pacaud Art & Illustration, 1984 ~ © A-GC.com

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